StreamNet provides access to these Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) documents and data sets in support of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s (NPCC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FW-Program).

In 2018, the CHaMP project was phased out following an NPCC recommendation. The extensive volume of documents and datasets from ESA/Sitka’s champmonitoring.org are now archived here on the StreamNet’s CHaMP website. 

NPCC memos related to CHaMP and final recommendations on CHaMP:

    • View project description and funding history of the CHaMP (Project # 2011-006- 00)
    • NPCC staff June 6, 2017 memo summarizing Council recommendations and information about CHaMP
    • NPCC Research Decision Letter to BPA from December 18, 2018 (see document table below for letter)

For additional details

CHaMP and BPA/NPCC FW Program

The CHaMP project was funded as a pilot project by BPA between 2011 and 2017 to assess if it could help address the requirements of the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power Supply (FCRPS, now CRS) BiOp and RPA 56.3 (see BPA Project 2011-006-00). It was proposed by the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP BPA Project 2003-017-00) and eight collaborating agencies to provide information on the status/trends in habitat conditions, and support habitat restoration, rehabilitation and conservation actions, performance assessments, and the adaptive management requirements of the 2008 FCRPS BiOp. The pilot was evaluated on a yearly basis and after the review in 2018, the pilot was discontinued. 

Background

The 2008 Biological Opinion (BiOp) on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) identified implementation of tributary habitat restoration projects as a means to offset mortality imposed by the FCRPS on anadromous salmonids. In 2010, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began development of the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) to meet FCRPS Action Agency prescriptions for habitat monitoring (FCRPS BiOp RPA 56.3). The BPA worked with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other regional fish management agencies to implement CHaMP.

The goal of CHaMP was to generate and implement a standard set of fish habitat monitoring (status and trend) methods in up to 26 watersheds across the Columbia River basin. The watersheds were chosen to maximize the contrast in current habitat conditions and also represent a temporal gradient of expected change in condition through planned habitat actions. Surveys were conducted in watersheds with perceived large juvenile life-stage survival gaps due to habitat impairments or that are home to existing high quality fish monitoring infrastructure. CHaMP implementation occured on the spatial scale of the Technical Recovery Team (TRT) populations with the intention for inference on habitat quality and quantity at the fish population level.

CHaMP was built around a single habitat monitoring protocol with a program-wide approach to data collection and management. The protocol is fish-centric, i.e., it measures habitat relevant to salmonids of interest under the BiOp. The CHaMP protocol is structured around a general understanding of the link between habitat attributes and specific life history requirements of salmonids managed under the 2008 BiOp. These fish are likely not only responding to watershed and reach conditions, but also to the conditions of individual channel units within reaches. Accordingly, the CHaMP protocol has been developed to capture habitat features that drive fish population biology.

CHaMP methods draw from many existing protocols as well as novel approaches to collecting and analyzing channel geomorphological data. The protocol is designed to maintain the rapid nature of existing stream habitat protocols, and to collect data within a geomorphological hierarchy spanning multiple spatial scales, i.e., within-channel unit, channel unit, geomorphic reach, watershed and subbasin scales. The protocol employs spatially continuous sampling strategies to conduct precise topographic surveys from which digital elevation models (DEMs) can be produced. These topographic surveys are augmented by other data (e.g., channel classification, fish cover, substrate composition, distribution and embeddedness, large woody debris, solar input and water temperature, stream discharge, water chemistry, riparian structure, and site-level human influence) that help to characterize aspects of channel units that influence site-scale fish production potential.

CHaMP data were used to evaluate the quantity and quality of tributary fish habitat available to salmonids across the Columbia River basin in wadeable, perennial streams below natural impassible barriers within TRT population boundaries. The stream habitat data generated by CHaMP were intended to be used in conjunction with salmonid growth, survival, abundance and productivity data to estimate fish-habitat relationships and assess the impact of habitat management actions on fish population processes across the Columbia River Basin. In addition to meeting FCRPS BiOp prescriptions (RPA 56.3), CHaMP supports habitat restoration, rehabilitation, and conservation action performance assessments and adaptive management requirements of the 2008 FCRPS BiOp.

CHaMP File Explorer

Navigate, search, and view most CHaMP files in a familiar folder system layout by opening the CHaMP File Explorer. 

CHaMP Documents

 

FileDescriptionFile Date
CHaMP Surveying – Total Station Setup video

Surveying – Total Station Setup video

Revised Tucannon Geomorphic Assessment_040611_with Appendices-6102e596-ac26-4ca3-aa85-d47844848296

This assessment is intended to strengthen the technical understanding of existing physical
conditions and geomorphic processes in the basin in order to identify and prioritize habitat
restoration opportunities. Anchor QEA characterized channel and floodplain conditions,
channel confinement, and the historic channel occupations area. The source, magnitude,
and distribution of hydrologic and sediment inputs through the basin were evaluated and
characterized. This information was used to delineate discrete reaches throughout the river;
potential restoration opportunities and concepts within each reach were identified and
discussed.

WorkshopDay1_GeomorphNetworkContext_Wheaton-Volk-fb66205b-29a4-4eb0-abc7-1505963fc5f8

Geomorphic & Network Context 2015 CHaMP Camp Advanced Workshop powerpoint

2015
Day 1 – 04 – Key Management Question 2 – Joe Wheaton-cb33efa0-c90c-4854-b09f-c5ba8b3b36f4

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop powerpoint

2014
GIS_Training_2015_Advanced_TIN_tutorial-bb5e4dd0-521a-4f62-9d66-740e69ddb0eb

CHaMP – Advanced TIN Editing files and documents

2015
GIS_Training_2015_IntroToGIS_tutorial-cb70665a-e1a3-474c-9d37-1d1eb7e1d339

GIS Training 2015 Intro To GIS tutorial documents and map files

2015
Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_1_ValidatingDataUpload-88955787-2877-4f68-bd49-d38cd62cf372

Quality Assurance – Stream Temp Validating Data Upload video

Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_2_ToolBasics-162e53ee-3cdc-44f0-8a75-c0f45fcd4417

Quality Assurance – Stream Temp Tool Basics video

Day 2 – 07 – River Styles – Joe Wheaton-ac53302c-3e33-443e-aa3d-936cce28a883

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop Day 2 powerpoint

River Styles Framework
Adapting River Styles Framework to Support Regional Tributary Habitat Salmonid Management Needs

2014
Day 1 – 03 – Key Management Question 1 – Nick Bouwes-5c68e497-cac5-4e90-8e1d-855b945ffb29

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop Day 1

River Styles Framework

Adapting River Styles Framework to Support Regional Tributary Habitat Salmonid Management Needs

2014
Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_4_SettingStatus-041860f0-632b-4673-b2af-17fe91d8f904

Quality Assurance – Stream Temp Setting Status video

Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_3_Anomalies-edec23f6-c8df-4365-be5f-c18f7a9c05ad

Quality Assurance – Stream Temp Anomalies video

Day 1 – 05 – Key Management Question 3 – Chris Beasley-ef1912e2-ac74-4ddd-b37a-7a2352ed5e06

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop

KMQ 3 – Tools and Products

2014
Day 1 – 02 – Overview – Chris Jordan-ecd51c55-ee6a-4d70-9709-274dcad546c6

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop Day 1 Supporting a BPA Framework to Help Meet Regional Salmonid Management Requirements

2014
Day 1 – 04 – Key Management Question 1 – ODFW and CRITFC-b06a1934-3a4b-4feb-8747-46c6004b5c0d

Day 1 – 04 – Key Management Question 1 – ODFW and CRITFC
Integrating Habitat and Fish Information to Inform Wise Management Decisions and Assessment of Salmon Population Recovery Actions

GIS_Training_2015_TIN_Editing_tutorial-06f18489-7ded-4f1c-9c7c-fd075b4b2805

GIS Training 2015 TIN Editing tutorial documents and files

2015
GIS_Training_2015_Vector_Editing_tutorial-1c726eef-3423-435d-a3dc-5e7b440d4cbf

GIS Training 2015 Vector Editing tutorial documents and files

2015
WorkshopDay3_5_FHM&NREI_Bailey-Wheaton-McHugh-9b5b30cf-6b45-410d-a819-9835fb6d8343

CHaMP Camp 2015, Advanced Modules Day 3: Fish Habitat Models and Beyond

BridgeCkIMWupdate_NBouwes-1ad5a5c5-3df6-4189-af4c-ef9a3be87b76

Bridge Creek Intensively Monitored Watershed: Partnering With Beavers In Stream Restoration powerpoint

02_Wheaton-5de3137c-72d5-445f-bd1d-8f58926dfe7c

2015 CHaMP Camp: How do you account for fish habitat with a total station?

2015
Day 2 – 09 – Review Study Designs and Metrics – Boyd Bouwes-bb196949-1dc1-4f0c-9107-a6b427a7bc34

Day 2. CHaMP and ISEMP Analysis and Synthesis Workshop: A Review of CHaMP’s interoperability, study design and metrics

2014
WorkshopDay2_GCD_Wheaton-e746d9c2-963b-4700-8c4d-bcc345d856d7

WorkshopDay2: GEOMORPHIC CHANGE DETECTION

2015
WorkshopDay3_3_GUT_Wheaton-a2077869-b6f7-453d-915d-2a5b66f3124e

2015 CHaMP Camp – Advanced Workshop

2015
Day 2 – 08 – Salmon Lifecycle Model – Carl Saunders-605e3db8-11a9-4ba1-80e5-9bf58084ef69

CHaMP and ISEMP Analysis and Synthesis Workshop: Salmonid Life Cycle Model power point

2014
2016_CHaMP_Protocol_201605015-634e917b-4347-4153-9973-5b933836e7ec

This document was funded by Bonneville Power Administration‟s Columbia Habitat Monitoring
Program (CHaMP; Project #2011-006) for use by BPA‟s CHaMP project. This version
incorporates comments received from the CHaMP 2015 Post Field Season Surveys.

2016
Day 2 – 05 – HabRate – Ted Sedell-7de46e01-004f-4938-9605-9b4792f1fa84

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop: Integrating ODFW’s Aquatic Inventories Project HabRate Model with CHaMP powerpoint

2014
CHaMP_GIS_Tutorials-302a5e4a-bda8-4af6-939b-422272363307

This collection of tutorials (and associated datasets) are intended to teach basic GIS methods used in the CHaMP Topographic Processing Workflow.

2013
GIS_Training_2015_Toolbar_Workflow_tutorial-001c9dc8-747a-4f86-a2c9-b4e2563a90ee

This Tutorial guides the user through the complete processing of a survey using the 2015 CHaMP Topographic Processing Toolbar in GIS. The user should already be familiar with basic GIS concepts before working through the material presented in this Tutorial. If the user is unfamiliar with GIS basics, additional tutorials are available through the CHaMP Topo Toolbar website (http://champtools.northarrowresearch.com/). This Tutorial uses sample data, but describes all processing steps and tools that may be needed during normal CHaMP topographic survey data processing.

Files and documents

2015
WorkshopDay3_1c_HabRate_Sedell-62cff416-e460-4524-b9d9-470bf6c1f169

2015 CHaMP Workshop: Structural Equation Modeling of Fish Habitat Relationships power point

2015
03_McHugh-f0aeb755-108c-4cc3-9f53-e798c4f919dd

2015 CHaMP Camp: CHaMP Data to Fish Management power point

2015
Day 2 – 00 – Flume Results – Joe Wheaton-92b21e3b-828c-4035-94b7-55b5a45d8ecf

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop: Flume Demonstration power point

2014
Tucannon_RS_Stages_1_2_Preliminary_Report-1bb7e35d-5c83-46fa-bdef-21cdc4979761

We are progressing through a geomorphic assessment of the Tucannon watershed using a modified version of the River Styles framework. The River Styles framework is a hydrologic and geomorphic classification system which provides tools for interpreting river character, behavior, geomorphic condition, and recovery potential (Brierley and Fryirs, 2005). It consists of a series of four stages that includes 1) an identification of the unique suite of River Styles (i.e., reach types) within the watershed, 2) an assessment of the current condition of the watershed, given the historical context, 3) predictions about the recovery potential and finally 4) implications for watershed management and restoration planning. This framework is widely used by watershed managers in Australia and New Zealand and is gaining traction in the Columbia River Basin. Our geomorphic assessment of the Tucannon River Watershed does not strictly adhere to the River Styles framework in that we do not explicitly incorporate all elements of Stages 2 – 4 (e.g., measured cross sections) and we bolster the condition assessment with spatially explicit network based models of riparian and floodplain condition.

2015
MacroinvertUpdate_NB_20131204-cf021225-2cd7-4b29-ad52-a8bbd7602295

Macroinvertebrate Sampling Update poweropint

2013
06_Hill-098e9510-8618-4089-be45-036be133cc49

Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program A day in the life powerpoint

01_Jordan-7c5d631b-6dc8-434a-a71a-bcfb84761c40

Why CHaMP? powerpoint about the background of CHaMP program

CHaMP_DEM-basedProtocol_NB_20131203-654a1099-ab48-46f7-a69b-3f10ca95545e

CHaMP DEM based protocol powerpoint

GCD_2011to2012_Wheaton-6c196ca2-73a6-4d77-b755-607624fe0903

STATUS OF GEOMORPHIC CHANGE DETECTION OF 2011 TO 2012 SURVEYS powerpoint

2012
TucMonitoring_SRSRB_Nov2017-84cce5d9-cdae-432b-ad7d-570ca320360c

Tucannon Monitoring Meeting powerpoint

2015
Day 2 – 02 – CHaMP Bugs 2014 – Nick Bouwes-043321b4-6921-4441-9ee2-7c37655e1ac8

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop: CHaMP Invertebrate Monitoring powerpoint

2014
Day 2 – 06 – Bioenergetics – Ryan Bellmore-be46beaa-d8bd-4111-ac44-b03fd382b46a

Modeling the Food Web Response to Restoration in the Methow River Using CHaMP Data powerpoint

Surveying – Introduction To Surveying Manual 1.0-03190d6e-d879-4bd6-b743-191a8b499b6f

This manual is an introduction to Champ Survey equipment and methodology. The manual is
designed to be utilized as a precursor to Champ Camp. The student is expected to read and study
all of the material contained herein prior to arrival at Champ Camp. The Champ Camp
Topographic training modules will support and supplement this information.

CHaMP_Workflow_Tutorial-f5503ded-5a91-43c0-aac2-52d7d848b4de

This Tutorial guides the user through the complete processing of a survey using the CHaMP Topographic Processing Toolbar in GIS. The user should have completed or already be familiar with the concepts presented in the ForeSight and GIS Tutorials before working through the material presented in this Tutorial.

2013
CHaMP_GUs_JoeW_20131203-76cd3a5d-a2af-4d8f-ba83-dad81ea2109c

CHaMP 2013 Post Season Workshop: Geomorphic Unit Derivation powerpoint

2013
WorkshopDay3_4_HydraulicModel_Nahorniak-cc8c73a4-7bf4-40d4-b34a-e096ccd06ad3

Introduction to CHaMP Hydraulic Modeling powerpoint

CHaMP_Intro&WhatIsNew2012_Ward-dcb782c2-9857-4f24-91a4-8ec7631ef443

CHaMP Introduction and What’s New powerpoint

Tucannon_RestorationEffectiveness_MonitoringResults2015-8074429f-7b9a-4414-b012-6af37ba94d7a

The Snake River Salmon Recovery Board (SRSRB) is coordinating the development of restoration designs
and implementation of restoration actions in the Tucannon River primarily focused on ESA listed spring
Chinook. A Geomorphic Assessment and Habitat Restoration study of the Tucannon mainstem has been
completed to assess historic and current conditions, and to assess and prioritize restoration actions best
suited to address ecological concerns identified in the Snake River Salmon Recovery Plan (AQEA 2011,
SRSRB 2011). Priority restoration actions identified during the Tucannon Assessment began in 2011. The
main restoration actions proposed are levee removal/setbacks, side-channel reconnection, and the
addition of large woody debris (LWD).

2015
Day 2 – 04 – BRT Extrapoloation – Kevin See-46cb09ed-3842-466a-9209-51a6e33c56d2

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop: Extrapolating Across a Stream Network powerpoint

2014
ISEMPWtrshdModelLemhi_JWhite-2336fa90-fc8f-480a-9ad8-94447e93bd66

Lemhi River Effectiveness Monitoring (ISEMP/CHaMP): Using Fish and Habitat data in the ISEMP Watershed
Model to evaluate the Lemhi Conservation Plan

SuneyeVsHStoMonitorCanopy_McCullough-52769726-c146-460e-a48b-3a0d282d452c

Evaluation of Solmetric SunEye vs. Heat Source Insolation Measurements as a Means to Monitor Trends in Riparian Canopy power point

2012
04_Jordan-8310d18d-ede7-4f24-a751-8baea3925885

CHaMP Camp 2015: Why are we sampling where we are and what will CHaMP data be used for? powerpoint

2015
DevRapidGeomorphAssessProc_NBouwes-d9e65363-3f50-4be7-a144-c1274f44c493

Development of a Rapid Geomorphic Assessment Procedure powerpoint

WorkshopDay1_Design&ModelBasedAnalyses_Nahorniak-da4ba336-1cd1-492e-af1a-79222fc48315

CHaMP Camp 2015: An Introduction to CHaMP Sampling and Data Analysis powerpoint

2015
WorkshopDay1_CHaMPDataAvailability_Volk-f8065085-1794-491f-b45e-402a158ceb6e

CHaMP Camp 2015: CHaMP data availability: finding what you need powerpoint

2015
WorkshopDay1_TempModel_McNyset-8322e4bf-a217-4ee4-9642-76d5938ea3f0

CHaMP Camp 2015: CHaMP Stream Temprature Models powerpoint

2015
Day 2 – 03 – NREI – Nick Bouwes-2709b8ab-ddba-419c-be5e-f7104a71b2f6

CHaMP and ISEMP State of the Science Workshop: Net Rate of Energy Intake powerpoint

2014
WorkshopDay3_2_LiDaR_DeMeurichy-14752f9c-068a-4677-aeb3-1adff0611624

CHaMP Camp 2015: Airborne Lidar & CHaMP Surveys powerpoint

2015
CHaMP_TempLoggerData_McNyset-34db75f8-1ac1-4914-b992-22eb4959200d

Exploring CHaMP Temperature Logger Data powerpoint

2012
HydraulicModelingUpdate_MN_20131204-0425b3b6-a9f9-441d-b137-c724a5ad4c23

CHaMP site Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) / Hydraulic modeling powerpoint

CHaMP Site CFD Modeling: Modeled results and Validation Data Comparisons

07_BouwesB-bcfb3edc-b9f3-4efb-a0bf-a4b8e2f1ab76

CHaMP Camp 2015: Measurements to Metrics to Models powerpoint

2015
05_ONeal-3b41e8bf-d3ca-4fec-b027-38a5d9251692

CHaMP Camp 2015: BPA Action Effectiveness Monitoring powerpoint

2015
Day 1 – 01 – Workshop Introduction – Chris Jordan-c51080ff-4ef9-4438-952d-3159b454199e

CHaMP – ISEMP Analysis and Synthesis Workshop: Welcome Powerpoint

Workshop Purpose:

To review how CHaMP-ISEMP habitat and fish data, analyses, and synthesis products could be used to support the FCRPS BiOp management community’s needs.

Objectives: 

  • Present options for converting monitoring data and analyses into usable and consumable products to help answer BPA Key Management Questions (KMQs).
  • Gather feedback from managers and policy decision-makers, monitoring practitioners and others on the proposed approaches.
2014
WorkshopDay3_1a_ModelingHabitatAttributes_Justice-61f3620a-f225-4aff-a5dd-20728dafc56c

CHaMP Camp 2015: Modeling relationships between CHaMP metrics and landscape characteristics in the Upper Grande Ronde River basin powerpoint

2015
DispHabStatusManyScales_Fortney-7937741b-2fd3-433d-b6b2-d1929751b368

Objective: summarize fish habitat data at various spatial scales

Utilize CHaMP data collected during 2011 and 2012 pilot field seasons

2012
CM.org – StreamTempQAProtocol_2014-95b36ef8-4b33-484a-807a-7a934ce3e025

CHaMP 2014 Stream Temperature
Quality Assurance Protocol

2014
TucannonMonitoringExample_RRNW_ShortCourse_2018-b2d690e6-f63d-4a22-bf0a-4ef24adf6b31

Tucannon River Monitoring powerpoint

CHaMP_HarnessingDEMs_JW-PB_20131203-1e84de70-6eaa-4ab9-a30f-de8077742ef4

HARNESSING DEMS FOR QUANTIFYING FISH HABITAT power point

2013
NREImodel_AHill-3ebb6ce5-9c0a-4a42-a2d1-50fa59e6a0ba

Net Rate Energy Intake (NREI) Model powerpoint

CM.org – Quality Assurance of Side Channel 2014-acc8c6d5-c44e-4bc0-82ff-9626f41877f5

Quality Assurance – Side Channels 2014

2014
CM.org – QualityAssuranceGuidelines 2014-c2e4f2c1-d748-44db-a71a-cb14bc6ded02

Quality Assurance – Guidelines 2014

2014
WatershedProdModDev_20131204-29543f7d-a697-422c-b16c-0d0069f80a0b

Watershed Production Model Development Update – December 4, 2013 powerpoint

2013
SPSurvey_CHaMP_UserGuide-85efbc50-14ff-46af-a9bd-5a771ae0eb0e

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) and its companion
project, the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP), provide long term monitoring of
anadromous salmonid population and habitat status in the Columbia River Basis. These
monitoring programs extensively utilize probability based survey designs, such as Generalized
Random Tessellation Stratified (GRTS) designs, that enable efficient sampling of a spatially
correlated resource, such as fish density by location in a stream network. The R package
spsurvey includes a set of analysis tools created specifically for design based analysis of
probability samples such as those obtained by GRTS designs.
This manual is intended as a user’s guide, specifically geared toward users of ISEMP / CHaMP
data sets, for using the spsurvey tools to analyze and draw inference from sampled data. It is
assumed that the readers, while having some experience using R, are not R experts, nor
statisticians.

FishHabModelingUpdate_KS_20131204-5b9bcd3d-1ee1-4311-92f8-018e5b44b601

Fish-Habitat Modeling Update – December 4, 2013 power point

2013
HabitatSuitModels_CMcG_20131204-dbf5ea49-99e2-4460-bd61-73ce0956f6e8

Habitat Suitability Models powerpoint

ISEMP-CHaMP Work Session
Dec. 4, 2013

2013
Site&WatershedErrorsVsMetrics_Nahorniak-accd89f5-1ce3-4890-9faf-5b2aa356dd30

Site and Watershed Standard Errors vs. Measurement Protocol Changes powerpoint

Site & Watershed Level Standard Errors Vs.
Measurement Protocol Changes

2012
CHaMPCamp2015_WorkshopAbstracts-a7859bc6-4073-4836-89b1-a003a530cdb5

All presentation abstracts from 2015 CHaMP Camp

2015
MetricEvalFrmwk_CV-BB_20131205-42c9062f-2a8e-459f-938b-275fcbd9c2d5

CHaMP Metric Evaluation Framework – December 5, 2013 powerpoint

2013
FishHabitatModeling_See-14aaf06d-fe98-4e30-b766-d40b1df86677

CHaMP Workshop: Fish Habitat Modeling
November 27-29, 2012

powerpoint

2012
CM.org – HitchPlanning-372b3d36-57a3-4055-93d5-f90544575086

A hitch is simply defined as a collect of sites visited by an organization during a set of days or weeks.
Hitches can be as short as one day or as long as thirty days. Each hitch must be assigned to one crew and
as a result one organization. Planning and monitoring hitches will help crew supervisors balance
workload, ensure implementation of the study design, and ensure that field data are being consistently
processed through-out the summer. During 2012, hitches were most useful when they extended the
duration of one month. Setting up distinct hitches for each month (June, July, Aug, Sept and Oct hitches)
was a good balance to the benefits of having defined sprints of work. Establishing hitches throughout
the field season is an effective way to establish goals for the crew, track progress toward completion,
keep up-to-date on data processing, and make adjustments to help stay on track.

ShearZonesUpdate_AH_20131204-0b6a2cf7-54e2-4c28-af50-7ad52d2516e8

Development Progress Update: Shear Zones – December4, 2013 powerpoint

2013
MeasToIndicators_PL_20131205-9985a872-1cb0-4b80-8e1b-466235b464cd

Measurements to Indicators – December 5, 2013 powerpoint

2013
Day1_Agenda&DriveTourLogistics_Final_20150601-8e6b587d-58fc-4bc1-bf06-f9cc2cbe7a45

This session of “CHaMP Camp”, the 10-day field training designed to teach collection of standardized salmonid habitat data using the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) protocol, marks the start of the final year of data collection under the three year CHaMP pilot project (BPA Project# 2011-006-00). The Day 1 agenda generally outlines the topics that will be presented in the morning. In the afternoon, attendees will tour sites along Catherine Creek for streamside CHaMP protocol demonstrations and to participate in discussions about fish ecology, freshwater tributary habitat, and related topics with project staff and collaborators.

2015
Scouting – Stream Temperature Logger-d6447ab6-347d-4743-af99-7134ac44f84c

HOBO TidbiT Directions for: Activation/Setup, Download, Export Data as a .csv or .xls and Deactivation Instructions

CHaMPCompletionReport2012_Ward-d501c3ce-4059-494c-be21-f3c60cbf0a2d

2012 Program Recap Status and Trend Highlights
Data Analysis Highlights 2013 Planning

2012
Accounts and Permissions on CM.org-4df57691-08c7-4d02-8e5d-dcf321e7ac98

The CHaMP Data Management System was built to meet the needs of the CHaMP program. Anyone who is engaged in implementing the CHaMP program will need an account on the CHaMP website, www.CHaMPMonitoring.org. Additionally, anyone who is interested in the progress or products produced by the program may want to register for an account

GIS_Training_2015_TIN_Visualization_tutorial-e1210b80-0b0f-4f53-90c7-7b2769e5e329

The ability to visualize a Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN) is important in order to understand the topographic features it represents. Since the process of surveying a sampling site can introduce errors, blunders or mis-interpolated topography, it is important to recognize the characteristics and features of a clean TIN so that these errors can be easily recognized. This tutorial is designed to guide the user though the features of a relatively clean (error-free) TIN representing a surveyed stream channel.

2015
VarianceDecomp_Larsen-5618ae21-d1ef-4823-a01a-b82c2653404e

Variance Decomposition powerpoint

CHaMP Status and Trend 2011_2014-9171b40a-caf3-42ad-82a9-106804fcbac1

This document contains a set of plots and a large table summarizing the status and trend results for selected CHaMP metrics from 2011−2014, as discussed in the Status and Trend Summary report within the annual CHaMP−ISEMP report.

CHaMP_2013_WkshpIntro_CJ_20131203-d6bb0297-4985-4e06-8d55-b47356f5c780

CHaMP 2013 Post-season Workshop Introduction powerpoint

2013
WorkshopDay2_RBT_Bailey-3888acf6-1fb6-49a9-ad0b-76e15dce0798

CHaMP Camp 2015 workshop: June 3, Presentation 1 – River Bathymetry Toolkit powerpoint

2015
WorkshopDay2_CHaMPWorkbench_Bailey-2b2cda84-7c6f-4b31-97fb-56160c4b1c8a
CHaMP Camp 2015 workshop: June 3, Presentation 2 – CHaMP Workbench powerpoint
2015
StreamTempSummer7dAM_Metadata-b9d4e7eb-3f8a-453f-adee-e4744dbc51bb

Temperature criteria have been developed to protect various species and life stages of salmonids (U.S. EPA 2003). Maximum temperatures, which typically occur in the summer, have the most potential impact on salmonids (U.S. EPA 2003). Criteria based on weekly maximum temperatures (7dAM) are the basis of water quality standards implemented by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as well as many other state and federal agencies (IDEQ, ODEQ 2008, U.S. EPA 2003, WDC). Weekly maximum temperature rolling averages are used because they fluctuate less, and represent a longer time frame than daily statistics (ODEQ 2008).

CHaMPCamp2015_WorkshopAgenda-Modules_Final-f4b7e24e-967f-4ed4-82c2-2cadd3df55e8
CHaMP Camp 2015 workshop – Final agenda and June 2-4 sessions
agenda
2015
Day 2 – 01 – A La Carte-bd7833cd-aa2e-4b47-abfd-b7690617322c

CHaMP Camp 2015 workshop – Final agenda and June 2-4 sessions: Science Supporting the Summary Products: Vignettes & Status Updates powerpoint

2015
SurveyIssues2015_1.0-52e59a38-db28-40d2-8673-ef621d23dcaf
CHaMP 2015 Surveying Reminders and Issues
2015
UGRR Restoartion Activities at CHaMP Sites-200e5a7b-b214-4089-8b3b-f2b5f0b3beb0
Microsoft Word – Restoration Documentation UGRR _ for upload to CHaMP website.docx
CHaMP_StudyDesignSummary_CV_20131203-baaa7963-5654-44a3-a7c6-7146bc890037

CHaMP Study Design Summary: Design Types powerpoint

2013
CHaMP_EndOfSeason_SR_20131203-c183877a-8981-419a-8ca0-96aca637d431
CHaMP 2013 Data Management Review: QA, data logger, broker, CM.org – December 3, 2013 powerpoint
2013
EstimatingStatus_Starcevich-b960924d-6b0a-462b-a546-85c128535316
Estimating Status for CHaMP’s Status & Trend Program powerpoint
2012
CHaMP_2013_TS_IssuesForm-be412a39-c710-499b-a60d-bad5a8de33fa
CHaMP 2013 Total Station Issues Form
2013
Post Processing – Data Download Cheatsheet-ccd56758-677c-4220-89d1-21bcb5b1d98e
Post Processing – Data Download Cheatsheet
Lidar_1.0
MBACI Protocol for Monitoring the Combined Effectiveness of Bank Stablizationa and Livestock Exclusion Projects

This document details the monitoring design, procedures and quality assurance steps necessary to document and report the effectiveness of Instream Habitat Projects at the Project site scale.

2014
Wenatchee_CHaMP_GDB_package-834b8047-9179-4bd7-8d74-75cf7adb543c

Wenatchee CHaMP geodatabase

Minam_CHaMP_GDB_package-533190d4-bf65-4d1c-a76b-19a7e9e7c6b5

Minam CHaMP geodatabase

South_Fork_Salmon_CHaMP_GDB_package-50076e3c-dbc9-4649-ae95-d42588d08561

South Fork Salmon CHaMP Geodatabase

Tucannon_CHaMP_GDB_package-501dedf0-7c6a-41e5-947e-165259687c6b

Tucannon CHaMP Geodatabase

Entiat_CHaMP_GDB_package-1e207edd-fef9-4c5b-85ca-892ccaac027e (1)

Entiat CHaMP geodatabase

Big_Navarro-Garcia_CHaMP_GDB_package-6cd0f71c-7f50-47d1-900b-0cd65356cd66 (1)

Big Navarro-Garcia CHaMP Geodatabase

Big_Creek_MFSalmon_CHaMP_GDB_package-7306b8ec-617c-4967-ad99-f909d11a32f0 (2)

Big Creek Middle Fork Salmon CHaMP Geodatabase

UGRR Restoration Activities at CHaMP Sites-200e5a7b-b214-4089-8b3b-f2b5f0b3beb0

UGRR Restoration Activities at CHaMP Sites

WATERSHEDS-AllProgramWatersheds

List of all Salmon populations within CHaMP watersheds

Yankee_Fork_CHaMP_GDB_package-f0310107-1ce1-4d70-a840-178d202c9b44

Yankee Fork CHaMP Geodatabase

TucannonSiteList_Information_20180211-001291a0-78e9-409d-8a02-0f09b3c04889

Tucannon Site List Data Information

Asotin_CHaMP_GDB_package-8b9f4ce2-f698-4349-9aa8-ef0a17ba5eaf

Asotin CHaMP GDB package

monuments_20140620

Monuments data collection form (blank)

 

Channel Units_20140620

Channel Units data form (blank)

discharge_20140620

Discharge data sheet (blank)

drift_chem_20140620

Drift Invertebrates Form (blank)

lwd_20140620

Large woody debris form (blank)

marker_ctrlpoints_20140620

Marker and control points data form (blank)

riparian_20140620

Riparian structure form (blank)

setup_widthcat_20140620
undercut_20140620
Air_water_20140620

Air and Water Temperature Data Form (blank)

benchmarks_20140620

Benchmark Form (blank)

2016-10-26_11.04_CHaMP_QAQC_Meeting_2

October 26, 2016 CHaMP meeting video

pebbles_20140620

Pebble Count Form (blank)

photos_20140620

Transect Photos data collection sheet (blank)

pooltailfines_20140620

Pool Tail Fines data collection sheet (blank)

2016-10-12_11.09_CHaMP_QAQC_Meeting_1

Oct 12, 2016 Meeting video

2015-10-21 11.34 CHaMP_QAQC_2

October 21, 2015 Meeting video

2015-10-14 11.33 New Meeting

October 14, 2015 Meeting video

2014-12-03 CHaMP_QA_RBT fixes

December 3, 2014 Meeting video

CHaMP_MetricQA_2016_20161111-03c2b918-1722-4622-b127-402e73bcb97e

Reviewing metrics in the CHaMP_Workbench: CHaMP QA 2016

ArcGIS_ForeSight_Toolbar_Guide-e450f79a-d0f5-42dd-aa51-8f433c3d798f

ArcGIS/ForeSight User Guide

CHaMP Nikon Survey Repair-dffa1750-45c1-4f73-a9ff-e034deee6bfe

This document describes the process for repairing a CHaMP survey that has errors in Z values due to a
processing bug in versions of the CHaMP Processing Toolbar (5.09 and older). Surveys with only a few
points (20 or fewer) should use these instructions to modify an already processed survey. Surveys with a
greater number of points should be reprocessed completely.

CM.org – StreamTempQAProtocol_2014-c87e0e3a-82e6-4851-8730-fcae7d68a4bf

CHaMP 2014 Stream Temperature
Quality Assurance Protocol

CHaMP_Topographic_Processing_QuickGuide_2017-40f618e2-3d0c-4b48-9280-68d906375923

CHaMP Topographic Processing Quick Guide 2017

CHaMP_QualityAssuranceGuidelines_2016_20161006-8664b4f8-f213-474d-b59c-751eafdb24cc

This document provides guidance on performing end-of-season quality assurance using the
functionality on CHaMPMonitoring.org. The quality assurance process will be most efficient
if you first ensure that auxiliary and topographic data for all of your sites has been uploaded to
CM.org using the Data Broker.

CHaMP_QA_SideChannels_MultipleWettedPolygons_Topo_Photo_Upload_2016-e717bf40-d92d-467c-9b03-7523142e04f7

In 2014, CHaMP modified how side channels are delineated during topographic post-processing by
adding a multi-threaded centerline in the main channel and all qualifying wetted side channels. The
objective of this document is to outline the steps used to check the accuracy of side channel delineation
within the topographic survey.

ForeSight_Processing_Guide-5a53c085-3351-43b0-91ee-0af24570d326

ForeSight Processing Guide 2013

Post Processing – Solemtric SunEye-67119b9e-a82b-4c3e-a9ee-b9eed5cec54d

This section describes the necessary steps for editing SunEye images and transferring data from
the SunEye to the CHaMP database. For more specific instructions, the user’s manual can be
downloaded here: Solmetric SunEye User Guide.pdf

Post Processing – Data Download Cheatsheet-e27f6540-8d4f-4eb0-8521-c4b6a0a6a1c6

End of Day
Transfer from Field Devices to Laptop Data Broker

Post Processing – Solemtric SunEye-3a3eb6a8-d063-4b49-8dae-951f212b23ad

This section describes the necessary steps for editing SunEye images and transferring data from
the SunEye to the CHaMP database. For more specific instructions, the user’s manual can be
downloaded here: Solmetric SunEye User Guide.pdf

GeoOptix Data Broker-97309a7c-8f2b-40b1-8d81-63773ba4e2ce

The Data Broker operates on the laptop and serves as a broker to move files between CHaMPMonitoring.org website,
the broker, and the iPads. You will use the broker to receive scouting information for the sites you plan to visit, to check
in data after visiting a site, and publish data sets for upload by CHaMPMonitoring.org. Typically, you will use the broker
at the beginning of the week to prepare for field data collection and at the end of the week to check data in.

StreamTemp_Priority_Sites_Methow_Wenatchee_Entiat-c187e53e-7384-40b9-a3f0-2c38e7b09b5a

Stream Temperature Logger Locations

Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_1_ValidatingDataUpload-88955787-2877-4f68-bd49-d38cd62cf372-9de4ac2d-0ee2-4c4b-b63c-8171a3fcf83d

video of validating stream temp quality assurance

Quality Assurance – 2017-11-07 CHaMP call #2-7e70aaa7-6e13-4c85-8ff1-b20f08d06d2c

CHaMP Quality Assurance meeting November 11, 2017

Quality Assurance – 2017-10-31 CHaMP call #1-a8b87584-2a2c-47f1-83bd-dc9e92272d5a

Quality Assurance meeting October 31, 2017

Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_4_SettingStatus-041860f0-632b-4673-b2af-17fe91d8f904-06b9cce9-a328-417d-965c-09133cabba59

Video setting status stream temprature

Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_3_Anomalies-edec23f6-c8df-4365-be5f-c18f7a9c05ad-88d7a33e-165e-4c35-9839-c207754e00da

Video Stream Temperature Anomalies

Quality Assurance – StreamTemp_2_ToolBasics-162e53ee-3cdc-44f0-8a75-c0f45fcd4417-65e8cc71-ddc5-4974-958c-90cbffaab0e9

Video Stream Temperature Tools Basics

CHaMP 2013 Lessons Learned Report 2015

Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program: 2013—Third Year Lessons Learned Project Synthesis Report

2015
Combined ISEMP CHaMP Annual Report 2014

ISEMP/CHaMP. 2015. Combined Annual Report for the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program and Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program: 2014. Prepared by ISEMP and CHaMP for the Bonneville Power Administration. Published by Bonneville Power Administration. XX pages.

2015
An Overview of the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program’s (CHaMP) Spatial-Temporal Design Framework

CHaMP’s primary objectives were to describe the status and trends of habitat attributes that are important for Endangered Species Act listed (ESA-Listed) Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and anadromous steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss growth and survival. To efficiently meet the data collection and analysis needs of the program, CHaMP applied a common spatial-temporal design framework to the selection of monitoring sites in each CHaMP watershed, standardized habitat monitoring methods across the subbasins, employed an integrated, web-based system for documenting methods and designs, implemented a web-based system for data management, and collaborated with other agencies conducting habitat monitoring in these subbasins to leverage existing designs and locations.

2016
ISEMP CHaMP Combined Annual Report 2016 Draft

This report presents an update on the implementation of Bonneville Power Administration’s (BPA) Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP; BPA Project 2003-017-00) and the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP; BPA Project 2011-006-00) during 2016. The work conducted under ISEMP and CHaMP covers key populations within the Upper Columbia River Spring-Run Chinook ESU and steelhead DPS, the Snake River Spring/Summer-Run Chinook ESU and steelhead DPS, and the Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS.
ISEMP/CHaMP. 2017. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) and Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) Annual Combined Technical Report, January – December 2016, BPA Projects 2003-017-00 and 2011-006-00, 93 Electronic Pages.

2017
CHaMP Briefing Materials 2010 PNAMP Steering Committee

BRIEF PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OF THE COLUMBIA HABITAT MONITORING PROGRAM
This document provides a brief overview of a proposed Columbia Basin-scale fish habitat monitoring program including program elements, map, and budget estimates. The Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) is being proposed by the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) and eight collaborating agencies1 to help Bonneville Power Administration meet the requirements of the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp, RPA 56.3). This program will provide information on the status/trends in habitat conditions, and will support habitat restoration, rehabilitation and conservation actions, performance assessments, and the adaptive management requirements of the 2008 FCRPS BiOp.

2010
CHaMP Status Report to ISRP/ISAB: Update on the Pilot Project 2013

Presentation to ISAB/ISRP – Status Report update on the pilot project

2013
ISEMP-CHaMP Fish-habitat relationship development presentation to ISAB ISRP 2013

Presentation to ISAB/ISRP on ISEMP-CHaMP fish-habitat relationship development

2013
PIBO-CHaMP Comparison for Federal Caucus 2013

Presentation to Federal Caucus: A comparison of two stream habitat monitoring programs, PIBO and CHaMP.
Why was this project undertaken?
•Data comparability–Are these data of similar quality/reliability?
•Determine if there are ways to more efficiently collect these data
•Can these data be used together to make statements about the conditions of streams?

2013
CHaMP 2012 Second Year Lessons Learned Report 2013

This document is a summary of the lessons learned from work conducted by the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) in the 2012 pilot year.

2013
CHaMP Response To Comments On Protocol 20110926

The focus of this document is to address comments received on the CHaMP Salmonid
Habitat Protocol Version 1.0. In addition to the comments on the CHaMP Habitat Protocol, described below, principle recommendations from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) regarding the
entire CHaMP program from their Research, Monitoring and Evaluation and Artificial Production Project Review Decision Document June 2011 are included.

2011
CHaMP 2011 Pilot Lessons Learned Report

The CHaMP 2011 Pilot Year Lessons Learned Project Synthesis Report is organized into three main chapters:(1).Lessons Learned: KMQs, Principles, ISRP concerns, and Project Implementation; (2) Data Review: What we learned from the 2011 data; (3) Implementation Review: What we learned from project implementation and how it could it be made more effective

2011
NPCC Decision Letter to BPA

On December 11, 2018 the Council completed a progress review of 25 projects engaged in research activities under the Fish and Wildlife Program. The Council’s recommendations to Bonneville regarding these projects are detailed in the attached document and summarized here.

The list of project recommendation includes the NPCC recommendation to BPA on the closing out of CHaMP (BPA project 2011-006-00)

2018

Organizations Participating in CHaMP and staff participating as of 2019

California Department of Fish and Wildlife

People

Crew Supervisor

  • Sean Gallagher
  • Elizabeth Mackey

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Big-Navarro-Garcia (CA)
  • CHaMP Training

Crew Leader

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • John Day
  • Tucannon

Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission

Crew Member

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training
  • Upper Grande Ronde

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Asotin
  • CHaMP Training
  • John Day
  • Tucannon
  • Umatilla
  • Upper Grande Ronde
  • Walla Walla

Eco Logical Research

Crew Leader

Crew Member

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Asotin
  • CHaMP Training
  • John Day
  • Tucannon
  • Upper Grande Ronde

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Tucannon

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Crew Member

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training
  • John Day
  • Minam
  • Upper Grande Ronde

Oregon State University

Crew Member

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Umpqua

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training
  • Lemhi
  • South Fork Salmon
  • Upper Grande Ronde

Crew Supervisor

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Asotin
  • CHaMP Training
  • Entiat
  • John Day
  • Lemhi
  • Methow
  • South Fork Salmon
  • Tucannon
  • Umatilla
  • Upper Grande Ronde
  • Wenatchee

Crew Supervisor

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Asotin
  • CHaMP Training
  • Entiat
  • John Day
  • Lemhi
  • Methow
  • South Fork Salmon
  • Tucannon
  • Umatilla
  • Upper Grande Ronde
  • Wenatchee

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Region 17

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training
  • Deschutes
  • John Day

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • CHaMP Training
  • Region 17
  • Yankee Fork

Crew Supervisor

Crew Leader

Watersheds

Go to the Watersheds section of the ESA maintained CHaMP website for additional details including study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization

  • Toppenish

CHaMP and BPA/NPCC FW Program

The CHaMP project was funded as a pilot project by BPA between 2011 and 2017 to assess if it could help address the requirements of the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power Supply (FCRPS, now CRS) BiOp and RPA 56.3 (see BPA Project 2011-006-00). 

The pilot was evaluated on a yearly basis (beginning with 2011) to determine the project’s effectiveness at the pilot stages monitoring 8 watersheds with the potential plan adding ten more for a total of 18 watersheds. 

This pilot project was proposed by the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP BPA Project 2003-017-00) and eight collaborating agencies to provide information on the status/trends in habitat conditions, and support habitat restoration, rehabilitation and conservation actions, performance assessments, and the adaptive management requirements of the 2008 FCRPS BiOp.

Watersheds Included in CHaMP

Below are the 17 watersheds that were included in the CHaMP pilot implementation.

For additional details, go to the Watersheds section of the Environmental Science Associates/Sitka Technology Group maintained CHaMP website which includes information on each watershed’s study design, field support, visits, measurements, metrics, characteristics, status, people and organization.

 

The ESU/DPS of focus in this watershed

  • Snake River Spring / Summer- run Chinook Salmon ESU
    • NWR Population ID – CKSNRssASO
  • Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS
    • NWR Name: Steelhead (Snake River Basin DPS) – Asotin Creek
    • NWR Population ID – STSNRsuASO

 

Upper Columbia River Steelhead DPS; Upper Columbia River Spring-run Chinook Salmon ESU

Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Upper Columbia River Steelhead DPS; Upper Columbia River Spring-run Chinook Salmon ESU

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Upper Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU; Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

CHaMP and BPA/NPCC FW Program

The CHaMP project was funded as a pilot project by BPA between 2011 and 2017 to assess if it could help address the requirements of the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power Supply (FCRPS, now CRS) BiOp and RPA 56.3 (see BPA Project 2011-006-00). 

The pilot was evaluated on a yearly basis (beginning with 2011) to determine the project’s effectiveness at the pilot stages monitoring 8 watersheds with the potential plan adding ten more for a total of 18 watersheds. 

This pilot project was proposed by the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP BPA Project 2003-017-00) and eight collaborating agencies to provide information on the status/trends in habitat conditions, and support habitat restoration, rehabilitation and conservation actions, performance assessments, and the adaptive management requirements of the 2008 FCRPS BiOp.

Note: need to check each hyperlink going to MR to ensure opens in a new tab

CHaMP Protocol Documentations 

All protocols developed and applied by CHaMP, including versions adjusted for the sampling years 2011 to 2019 are maintained in MonitoringResources.org. Hyperlinks are provided below:

BPA – MBACI Protocol for Estimating Instream Juvenile Salmonid Abundance v1.0
Years 2013-2019

This document details the monitoring design, procedures, and quality assurance steps necessary to document and report the effectiveness of Partial Barrier Projects at the project site scale. This supports the Bonneville Power Administration’s (BPA) programmatic approach to project level Action Effectiveness Monitoring (AEM), as documented in “Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: A programmatic approach for the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program.” This is based on the Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB) protocol,–“Monitoring Effectiveness of Fish Passage Projects” (ID: 34) (https://www.monitoringmethods.org/Protocol/DownloadDescription/34), and the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) (ID: 18) (https://www.monitoringresources.org/ Resources/Program/Detail/18); however, variations in the monitoring design and metrics collected required modification of the protocol.

CHaMP- Scientific Protocol for Salmonid Habitat Surveys within the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP)

Years 2011 to 2013

CHaMP is designed as a Columbia River basin-wide habitat status and trends monitoring program built around a single protocol with a programmatic approach to data collection and management (RM&E Workgroup 2010). CHaMP will result in the collection and analysis of systematic habitat status and trends information that will be used to assess basin-wide habitat conditions. When coupled with biological response indicators, this status and trends information will be used to evaluate habitat management strategies. This program will be integrated with ongoing Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Program (PNAMP) recovery planning efforts and will be part of the collaborative process across Columbia Basin fish management agencies and tribes and other state and federal agencies that are monitoring anadromous salmonids and/or their habitat. The implementation of CHaMP will characterize stream responses to watershed restoration and/or management actions in at least one population within each steelhead and spring Chinook Major Population Group (MPG) which have, or will have, “fish-in” and “fish-out” monitoring (identified in RPA 50.6), thereby meeting the requirements of RPA 56.3, RPA 57, and RPA 3. CHaMP was designed to deliver trends in habitat indicators and requires that monitoring occurs for three cycles of a sampling panel (see section 1.6), at least 9 years.

Spatial Design

 

 

Data Analysis Methodology

 

Note for Drift Invertebrate Method:

CHaMP recognizes that collaborators may also choose to optionally collect benthic macroinvertebrates. If benthic macroinvertebrates are collected, we recommend that collaborators implement sampling methods outlined in “Methods for the collection and analysis of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in wadeable streams of the Pacific Northwest” (PNAMP 2007; https://www.monitoringmethods.org/Protocol/Details/44). In essence, the PNAMP protocol calls for sampling a total of 8 ft2 from riffle or fast water habitats throughout the reach, composited from eight individual 1 ft2 samples selected randomly or systematically using a D-frame kick net, Surber, or Hess sampler. 

 
While the basic methods outlined in the PNAMP protocol are recommended, we also suggest the following sampling and processing methods in order to insure consistency with existing CHaMP collaborators (e.g., CRITFC). These alternate methods include: 

i. Sample timing. 

a. Samples should be collected during base flow only (e.g., July 15 – September 30) compared to the recommended period from July 1 – October 15 in order to control for the effects of stream flow and seasonality of macroinvertebrate communities. 

ii. Laboratory processing. 

a. When subsampling is used, the recommended number of organisms sampled is 500 compared to the suggested minimum of 300 organisms. 

b. The taxonomic resolution of sampling to the “lowest practical level” should be determined by the research question or biotic index intended for use. 

c. If subsampling is used, processing should include a 10-min search for large and rare organisms, but organisms found during the search should be recorded separately from other data. 

 

Spatial Design

 

 

Data Analysis Methodology

 

Spatial Design

 

 

Data Analysis Methodology

 

Spatial Design

 

 

Data Analysis Methodology

 
  • Protocol Documents
    [No documents to display]

Need to copy paste the annual protocols for all the below from https://www.champmonitoring.org/Program/Details/1#tab-protocol~#protocol2038 

Complete Fish Passage Barriers Projects

Years 2014-2019

BPA – EPT Monitoring Effectiveness of Complete Fish Passage Barriers Projects v1.0

The protocol details the monitoring design, procedures and quality assurance steps necessary to document and report the effectiveness of: Complete Fish Passage Barriers projects at the project site scale. This supports the Bonneville Power Administrations Programmatic approach to project level Action Effectiveness Monitoring (AEM) for Extensive Post Treatment (EPT), as documented in “Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: a programmatic approach for the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program”. This is based on the WA Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB) protocol SRFB – Monitoring Effectiveness of Fish Passage Projects (ID: 34) (https://www.monitoringmethods.org/Protocol/Details/34) however variations in the design and metrics collected required modification of the protocol.

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Partial Fish Passage Barriers Projects

Years 2014-2019

 

BPA – MBACI Protocol for Monitoring the Effectiveness of Partial Barrier Projects v1.0

This document details the monitoring design, procedures, and quality assurance steps necessary to document and report the effectiveness of Partial Barrier Projects at the project site scale. This supports the Bonneville Power Administration’s (BPA) programmatic approach to project level Action Effectiveness Monitoring (AEM), as documented in “Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: A programmatic approach for the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program.” This is based on the Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB) protocol,–“Monitoring Effectiveness of Fish Passage Projects” (ID: 34) (https://www.monitoringmethods.org/Protocol/DownloadDescription/34), and the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) (ID: 18) (https://www.monitoringresources.org/ Resources/Program/Detail/18); however, variations in the monitoring design and metrics collected required modification of the protocol.

Fish passage barriers, such as culverts and dams, can restrict movement of adult and juvenile fish, as well as degrade fish habitat by affecting transport of sediment, wood and other organic materials, and can restrict nutrient transport from returning spawning fish (Roni et al. 2002). It has been shown that if suitable habitat is present upstream of the barrier and/or fish have historically used upstream habitat, the likelihood of fish moving upstream and utilizing that habitat after successful barrier removal is high (SRFB 2009).  Because of this, when implemented properly, fish passage improvements are a very popular kind of habitat restoration project and have great potential to create dramatic improvements in fish production in a very short time (1-5 years) (SRFB 2009). However, detecting statistically significant increases in fish density may be difficult unless fish numbers downstream of the barrier before restoration work are sufficient for statistical tests (SRFB 2009).

This protocol details the monitoring procedures and methods necessary to document and report the reach-scale effectiveness of these projects.  Projects designed to restore fish passage that can be monitored using this protocol include actions such as bridge projects, culvert improvements, dam removals, debris removals, diversion dam passage, fishway construction, and weirs.

Questions to be answered:

  • Does the project reflect the design and requirements in the permit and/or funding application?
  • Has the engineered fish passage project continued to meet fish passage and design criteria post-project for at least five years?
  • Has the fish passage project demonstrated upstream presence of target species (by life stage) post-project within five years?
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Bank Stabilization

Years 2014, 2015 ??

BPA MBACI Monitoring Effectiveness of Instream Habitat Projects (Bank Stabilization) v1.0

 

Many streams in the Pacific Northwest have depleted wood volume due to past human activities such as logging in riparian areas, salvage logging of wood in streams, splash-dams, and misguided attempts to remove perceived obstructions to salmon migration.  In addition, streams have been modified and simplified due to agriculture and urban development.  This process has reduced channel complexity, isolated main stem habitats from side-channels and floodplains, reduced cover for aquatic species, and altered channel morphology.  Instream structures can be used to create pools, increase habitat complexity, reduce sediment transport, trap gravel needed for spawning, stabilize stream channels, provide food for aquatic invertebrates, and provide stream nutrients, increasing overall stream productivity (Roni and Quinn 2001). As a result, installation of instream structures, particularly placement of large woody debris (LWD), has become one of the longest used and most common techniques for improving fish habitat and mitigating human-caused degradation (Roni and Quinn 2001; Roni et. al. 2005).  Use of instream structures began as early as the 1930’s in the Midwest and has been adapted to the higher gradient systems in the Pacific Northwest (Roni et al. 2005).

The effectiveness of instream structures in enhancing habitat has been debated due to the lack of evaluation, as well as confounding results due to improper structure placement and lack of documentation of effects on factors directly limiting habitat quality (Roni et al. 2005). Calls to better evaluate habitat improvement projects began in the early 1980s (Reeves and Roelofs 1982), and continued throughout the 1990s (Reeves et al. 1991; Chapman 1996; Kauffman et al. 1997). Others have suggested the approach to restoration should shift to protecting high-quality habitats and restoring connectivity and watershed processes before implementing instream habitat improvement projects (Roni et al. 2008; Frissell and Nawa 1992), or focusing on restoring riparian forests with trees large enough to replenish LWD naturally in the system over time (Collins and Montgomery 2002). The need for additional effectiveness monitoring and evaluation is widely apparent in the Pacific Northwest.

This document details the monitoring design, procedures and quality assurance steps necessary to document and report the effectiveness of Instream Habitat Projects at the Project site scale. This supports the Bonneville Power Administration’s Programmatic approach to project level Action Effectiveness Monitoring (AEM), as documented in “Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: a programmatic approach for the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program”. This protocol is based on the Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board  (SRFB) protocol, “SRFB – Monitoring Effectiveness of Instream Habitat Projects” (ID: 35) (https://www.monitoringmethods.org/Protocol/Details/35); however, variations in the design and metrics collected required modification of the protocol.  This approach also draws heavily from the Scientific Protocol for Habitat Surveys within the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP) (ID:806). This document details the monitoring design and procedures necessary to document and report reach scale effectiveness of projects treating:

·         Channel Reconfiguration

·         Installed Deflectors

·         Log and Rock Control weirs

·         Roughened Channels

·         Woody Debris

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Livestock Exclusion

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Off-Channel/Floodplain

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Benthic Macroinvertebrate

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AEM Floodplain and CHaMP

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AEM Multi-Treatments

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CRITFC Snorkeling

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